Professor Ranjeny Thomas  

Arthritis Queensland Chair of Rheumatology
The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute 




Rheumatoid Arthritis 


Arthritis Queensland Chair in Rheumatology


"With Arthritis Queensland's unwavering and generous support, we have significantly expanded the arthritis research profile at UQ, and with it, provided hope for millions of people around the world affected by this debilitating disease.  

Thank you for your commitment to the fight against rheumatoid arthritis."


University of Queensland


Arthritis Queensland's donors have supported Professor Thomas' work at The University of Queensland for over 25 years.

Professor Thomas and her team undertake world leading research into rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.

She has increased our understanding of autoimmune diseases; helped to develop the global research workforce and taken huge steps forward in the potential production of a new curative treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. 

So far, Professor Thomas' work has resulted in...

7

book chapters written that help explain how rheumatoid arthritis works at a cellular level

28

supervised PhD candidates who now work in health and research institutions across Australia and the world

20+

authored publications to share her  research findings and increase understanding of rheumatoid arthritis internationally

DEN-181

developed  a potential new curative treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (DEN-181) that is currently in human trial phase 





About Professor Ranjeny Thomas


Professor Thomas' research is focused on the study of the biology and clinical use of human dendritic cells in autoimmune disease. It has explored basic mechanisms of immunity and dendritic cell function in autoimmune disease.

Professor Thomas is a graduate of the University of Western Australia. She received her MBBS in 1984, and then trained in Perth as a rheumatologist. She commenced a research fellowship with Peter Lipsky at Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas in 1990, where she first identified and characterised human circulating dendritic cell precursors. Professor Thomas is now Professor of Rheumatology at University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, consultant Rheumatologist at Princess Alexandra Hospital and fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

Her research is focussed on the study of autoimmune disease and restoration of tolerance. Through this work, she developed and tested the first rheumatoid arthritis vaccine. She has also contributed major insights into the pathogenesis of spondyloarthropathy and autoimmune diabetes, leading to the development of disease biomarkers and innovative immunotherapies.